Most Engaging Articles of 2009

Engagement – that’s what this whole product management blogging thing is about.  Check out what Tyner Blain readers found to be the most engaging articles in 2009.

Deep Dives

If you’re new to Tyner Blain, you may be surprised by the length of the articles here.  I joke that they are long because I don’t have time to edit.  Stewart Rogers jokes that they are long because I’m incapable of writing a short article.  If you’ve been here a while, you know what you’re in for.  If you’ve been here a long while, then you’re glad (like me) that I don’t write one per day any more.

Product Management is simultaneously a broad and deep discipline, requiring us to have a breadth of perspective combined with a depth of insight.  We then have to apply that in a market context, effectively navigating the political waters of our organizations.  Most of the articles here either try to skim the breadth of a range of related topics, or plumb the depths of a single topic.  Doing that in under a thousand words is pretty hard.  Most of the articles here also link to other articles, to try and provide even more depth and context, and encourage additional critical thinking.

One measure of the quality of the articles here is how often they stimulate readers to read further, or dive deeper into the topics.  While web analytics won’t allow us to measure how thought-provoking an article is, we can look to see how many people dive into the linked articles, versus how many people move on to something else.  We can measure the bounce rate of an article to see how often people leave a page without following any of the “tell me more” links.

Looking at ~170,000 page views at Tyner Blain in 2009, narrowed down to only those articles with at least 100 page views, here is the top-ten list of most engaging (or “least abandoned” if you’re a “cup is half empty” person) articles:

  1. Use Case Series: Introduction: A collection of articles on the “traditional” forms of use cases – informal, formal, UML.
  2. Agile Development of Use Cases: A dive into the dynamics and cadence of an agile process for developing use cases.
  3. How Do You Manage Market Data?: A collection of articles exploring different market-immersion techniques in depth.
  4. Scheduling Requirements Changes – Part 2: A focus on practical techniques for managing change with an agile development process.
  5. Yesterday’s BPMN Post Was A Big Fat Lie: A mea culpa and clarification of interest to folks following the BPMN Series.
  6. Everything I Needed To Know I Forgot in Kindergarten: Why asking why? is important.
  7. Plan Your Next Sprint by ROI – Part 1: Prioritizing by Bang for the Buck, not just Bang.
  8. Ten Common Mistakes of Going Agile: A collection of articles about common pitfalls encountered when adopting agile practices.
  9. Perpetually Almost Finished Projects: Organizing a project with discrete deliverables and rolling-wave planning to avoid the “90% done, 90% remaining” problem.
  10. How To Use Timeboxes for Scheduling Software Delivery: One of my personal favorites.  A rational approach to making trade-offs when your “perfect” plan has to change.

OK Stewart, that’s only 519 words.

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One Comment

  1. Great list of posts! Plus I love the 500 word post. :)
    Stewart

5 Trackbacks

  1. By Scott Sehlhorst on January 5, 2010 at 7:04 am

    New Tyner Blain Article: The Most Engaging (Tyner Blain) Articles of 2009 http://bit.ly/4QJ30i #prodmgmt

  2. By Anonymous on January 5, 2010 at 7:04 am

  3. By Sally Duda on January 5, 2010 at 10:58 am

    RT @sehlhorst: New Tyner Blain Article: The Most Engaging (Tyner Blain) Articles of 2009 http://bit.ly/4QJ30i #prodmgmt

  4. By Ryan Strynatka on January 5, 2010 at 11:20 am

    By @sehlhorst: Most Engaging Articles of 2009 http://bit.ly/6vlxog #prodmgmt

  5. By Stewart Rogers on January 21, 2010 at 9:35 pm

    "Most Engaging Articles of 2009" http://bit.ly/81Bt0A #prodmgmt

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