Monthly Archives: March 2008

Recycling An Active Listening Article

recycling

We’re dedicating our “blogging time” this week to doing some infrastructure upgrades – we have to address some security issues on the site. Until we get through these changes, we’ll be recycling some of our existing content. For our recent readers, it will be “new to you” and for our long time readers, we appreciate your patience. Today we look at one of our better received articles on active listening.

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Plan For Today, And Plan Correctly For Tomorrow

present Instead of future

Prioritize the present when planning your product. Neglecting the future is almost as bad as over-emphasizing it. The key is to incorporate your plans for the future correctly by making them play second fiddle to the present needs of your market. Serve both today and tomorrow – but prioritize today.
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Michael Arrington’s Inbox is Fat!

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Michael Arrington has 2400+ unread emails in his inbox. And he needs someone to fix it.

If you are the person with the idea to save us all, send me an email and tell me all about it. Actually, strike that. Drop by my house and tell me all about it. I don’t want your message to get lost in my inbox.

Michael Arrington

Michael is looking for the email equivalent of a magic diet pill. He can’t change his behavior, so he needs a dietary supplement. The dieting-market is huge, and products succeed playing on that emotion for dieters. Is email management the same?
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Uncovering Requirements With UML Class Diagrams Part 5

digging

In this article, we build on our ability to represent straight forward business relationships in UML class diagrams. These relationships describe how two objects are related to each other. Representing relationships in class diagrams helps us to better understand the domain and helps us to uncover hidden requirements. Occasionally, we have to deal with more complex relationships that involve more than two objects to properly describe. This does not happen as frequently, but when it does, our modeling efforts are more likely to uncover overlooked requirements. In this article we learn how to describe relationships that involve more than two objects.

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Uncovering Requirements With UML Class Diagrams Part 4

dozer

The hardest part of gathering requirements effectively is uncovering the requirements that people don’t immediately tell you. You have to ask the right questions. And one of the best ways to find the right questions to build a class diagram of the business domain. This article continues our introduction to class diagrams.

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Uncovering Requirements With UML Class Diagrams Part 3

digging

UML Class Diagrams are very effective at uncovering requirements. They give us insight into how the business thinks about objects and their relationships. And from that understanding, we think to ask questions we might otherwise overlook. In this part of our series, we look at how to represent when one object is made up of other objects. The two types of relationships we explore are composition and aggregation.

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Uncovering Requirements With UML Class Diagrams Part 2

front loader

We continue our exploration of UML Class Diagrams with this article that explores how to represent basic business relationships in a class diagram. Drawing these relationships can dramatically clarify requirements documents. Using a class diagram to supplement other requirements documents provides for a centralized reference that enables a shared understanding of the problem domain. That understanding prevents mistakes in interpreting requirements.

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