Flashback: A Year Ago This Week on Tyner Blain [2006-06-09]

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A look back at the best from a year ago.

Writing Attainable Requirements

rule 4 of writing requirements

One of the ten big rules of writing a good MRD is writing attainable, or realistic requirements. These are requirements that can be practically implemented, by our team, according to our schedule. Practicality is a function of the skills of our team members, the costs that we face to implement a particular requirement, and the circumstances in which we are developing. Agile proponents use the phrases ‘people trump process’ and ‘politics trumps people.’

Writing Complete Requirements

rule 5 of writing requirements

One of the ten big rules of writing a good MRD is writing complete requirements. We identify problems and opportunities in the market. We determine that one of these problems is valuable enough and practical to implement. Then we have to write the requirements, and make sure that the requirements will completely solve the targeted problem.

Writing Consistent Requirements

rule 6 of writing requirements

One of the ten big rules of writing a good MRD is writing consistent requirements. Consistency within an MRD has two dimensions that are important to requirements – logical consistency and grammatical consistency. There is also the element of writing an MRD that is consistent with other documentation – external consistency.

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